Religious Records Part 3 – Nova Scotia and New Brunswick

Last post we started our trek across Canada in search of Religious Records, by looking at Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island. Now we\’re going to look at Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Nova ScotiaFor a brief outline of the religious history of Nova Scotia, take a look at anglicanhistory.org\’s page on The Church of EnglandContinue reading “Religious Records Part 3 – Nova Scotia and New Brunswick”

Vital Statistics Part 2- Nova Scotia and New Brunswick

Last week we looked at Newfound and Labrador, and Price Edward Island. Now let\’s look at Nova Scotia and New Brunswick: Source: http://ontheworldmap.com/canada/province/nova-scotia/nova-scotia-road-map.html Nova ScotiaCivil registration in Nova Scotia is rather convoluted. Marriages began as early as 1763. However, it was optional, and the surviving records are incomplete. Births and deaths didn\’t start until 1864, andContinue reading “Vital Statistics Part 2- Nova Scotia and New Brunswick”

Who\’s Victorine\’s mother? Using Siblings to Solve a Problem

Some of us research every person in a family tree. Some of us concentrate more on our direct line. Unless you\’re doing a One Name or One Place study, it really just comes down to personal preference.  But even if you\’re concentrating on your direct line, make sure you are making note of your ancestor\’s siblings asContinue reading “Who\’s Victorine\’s mother? Using Siblings to Solve a Problem”

Don\’t Dismiss that Family Story!

Genealogists are taught that we must be able to back up our conclusions with proof. Ideally, we should have three different sources to prove our assertion. The best sources are of course civil registration and church records. But what about family stories? On the surface, family lore is not a wholly reliable source. Over generations,Continue reading “Don\’t Dismiss that Family Story!”