CSI: Nova Scotia – Coroner’s Inquisitions on Family Search

I almost titled this post using the tv show Quincy, but then realized there’s a whole generation of people out there that would have no clue what I was referring to. Trolling the FamilySearch catalog has once again paid off. If you’re unfamiliar with the catalog feature on Family Search, you are doing your researchContinue reading “CSI: Nova Scotia – Coroner’s Inquisitions on Family Search”

Immigration Before 1865 at Library and Archives Canada Part 4

Life got in the way of blogging last week. So a week late, here is Part 4. In this post, I’m going to look at what I thought were the most interesting record sets in the collection Immigration Before 1865. Lists of immigrants from Londonderry County, Ireland, that were contained in the original Ordnance SurveyContinue reading “Immigration Before 1865 at Library and Archives Canada Part 4”

Immigration before 1865 at Library and Archives Canada Part 3

The last couple of posts I’ve been highlighting pre 1865 Immigration records at Library and Archives Canada. For Part 3, I’m going to look at some of the post immigration records in the LAC’s database Immigrants before 1865. German settlers from New York in Markham Township, Upper Canada (1793 to 1808) This collection is digitizedContinue reading “Immigration before 1865 at Library and Archives Canada Part 3”

Immigration before 1865 at Library and Archives Canada Part 2

Last post, I gave a brief overview of the collection Immigrants Before 1865 on Library and Archives Canada. This post, I’m going to start looking at some of the record sets included that have been digitized. This post will be looking at passenger lists that have been digitized on the website Heritage. Foreign Protestants ofContinue reading “Immigration before 1865 at Library and Archives Canada Part 2”

Immigration before 1865 at Library and Archives Canada Part 1

It wasn’t until 1865 that Canada started routinely retaining passenger lists. Because of this, pre 1865 immigration records are difficult to find. The exceptions are if your ancestor came from a large immigration scheme, such as the Foreign Protestants. Even then, most of what is out there is piecing together fragments. And if your ancestorContinue reading “Immigration before 1865 at Library and Archives Canada Part 1”

Alberta Ancestors: Homestead Records on Internet Archive

My locations of interest are no where near where I live. I was researching from a distance even pre pandemic. Because of this, I’ve gotten pretty good at ferreting out digitized records in unusual places. Don’t get me wrong, on site researching is still best. Only a fraction of what’s out there is online. AndContinue reading “Alberta Ancestors: Homestead Records on Internet Archive”

Was Your Ancestor a Ship Owner? Ship’s Registries at the LAC

Records of ownership are a good source of tracking your ancestor. The type that first comes to mind are land records. But if your ancestor owned ships, another good source are Ship’s Registries. While these do not give a lot of information on your particular ancestor, they can provide clues for follow up research. IfContinue reading “Was Your Ancestor a Ship Owner? Ship’s Registries at the LAC”

Getting a Sense of Community through the Community Stories Collection

Genealogy is more than just collecting names and dates. Each person on your family tree has a story to tell. Part of their story is shaped by the communities they have lived in. Canada is a huge country, the second largest in the world. But each little corner of this country is different. The experiencesContinue reading “Getting a Sense of Community through the Community Stories Collection”

Locating Records with MemoryNS

So let’s say you’ve found a possible solution to an ancestral problem. You know there’s a record set, but you don’t know where it might be located. Or perhaps you are looking for inspiration and the thought of searching each individual repository’s website (if they have one) feels a little daunting. If your ancestor livedContinue reading “Locating Records with MemoryNS”

Going to Court with The Eastern Law Reporter

Court records can be hard to get when researching from a distance. I stumbled across a great resource on Canadiana recently. The Eastern Law Reporter covered court cases in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island from 1906 to 1915. Canadiana has 25 issues available, from 1909 to 1911. Now there are 2 volumesContinue reading “Going to Court with The Eastern Law Reporter”